Housing Authorities in Montana

State of Housing in MontanaThe Montana Housing Division administers the following programs:The Section 8 programs;The Housing Choice Voucher Program; Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (VASH) Program; Shelter Plus Care Program; The Project-Based Section 8 Program, and the HOME Investment Partnerships Program. They issue tax-exempt Mortgage Revenue Bonds to provide funds to purchase mortgages from participating lenders across the state of Montana and to finance development of multifamily housing.

Homeownership Program

First-Time homebuyers who have low to moderate income are given 30-year fixed-rate loans so they can purchase their own home.

First-time Homebuyer Education

HUD-certified counseling agencies provide counseling to first-time homebuyers. Counseling consists of information on the purchase and rental of housing, money management, budgeting, credit counseling, prevention of mortgage default and rent delinquencies that lead to foreclosure or eviction, home maintenance, fair housing laws, and requirements and guidance regarding the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage application. The objective of the counseling is to help homebuyers, homeowners, and tenants to improve their housing conditions and to meet their responsibilities.

Multifamily Program

The Montana Board of Housing offers financing to produce rental housing that is affordable for low-income Montanans.The Multifamily Program monitors these properties to ensure that they comply with federal and state requirements and that they fulfill the obligations they committed to for the financial assistance they receive.

  • The Reverse Annuity Mortgage Program is one of the few RAMs that has been implemented by a StateState of Housing in Montana Housing Finance Agency and Montana is proud of the support we have been able to extend to many low-income seniors who wish to stay in their home as long as possible.
  • The Risk Sharing Program is a collaboration between the Montana Board of Housing and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) which provides FHA insured permanent financing for units of multifamily rental property in Montana.
  • The General Obligation (G.O.) Program is a source of permanent mortgage financing for affordable rental housing which meets certain low income occupancy and rent limitation requirements.

Low Income Housing Tax Credit Program

The low income housing tax credit is available under Section 42 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. The credit is a federal income tax credit for owners of qualifying rental housing which meets certain low income occupancy and rent limitation requirements.The credit is taken as a reduction in participants’ tax liability over a 10 year period. The credit can also be sold to investors to act as a financing source.

General Obligation Multifamily Loans

The General Obligation (G.O.) Program is a source of permanent mortgage financing for affordable rental housing which meets certain low income occupancy and rent limitation requirements. The Board provides mortgage underwriting and loan management as well as financing.

Tenant Based Section 8 Housing Assistance Programs

This program allows very low income families to pay a set amount towards rent and utilities, based on their gross adjusted income (currently 30%).Very low income families have incomes of 50 percent or less of the HUD median family income for the county in which the family resides, established by HUD annually. The programs provide subsidy payments to property owners on behalf of program participants.

Weatherization Program

The State of Montana, through the Department of Public Health and Human Services, offers two programs aimed at helping Montanans reduce their heating costs. The Weatherization Program helps participants to improve the heating efficiency of their homes and thus reduce their energy consumption. The Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LIEAP) pays part of winter energy bills for eligible people.

Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (VASH)

The HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program combines Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) rentalState of Housing in Montana assistance for homeless Veterans with case management and clinical services provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). VA provides these services for participating Veterans at VA medical centers (VAMCs) and community-based outreach clinics.Every year since 2008, HUD and VA have awarded HUD-VASH vouchers based on geographic need and public housing agency (PHA) administrative performance. After determining which areas of the country have the highest number of homeless Veterans, the VA Central Office identifies VA facilities in the corresponding communities. HUD then selects PHAs near to the identified VA facilities, taking into consideration the PHAs’ administrative performance, and sends the PHAs invitations to apply for the vouchers.

Shelter Plus Care Program

The S+C program provides rental assistance for homeless people with disabilities, primarily those with serious mental illness, chronic problems with alcohol and/or drugs, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and related diseases. Rental assistance grants must be matched in the aggregate by supportive services that are equal in value to the amount of rental assistance and appropriate to the needs of the population to be served.

Reverse Annuity Mortgage (RAM) Program

Elderly Programs consist of the Reverse Annuity Mortgage Loan Program (RAM). The RAM program was implemented by the Board in October of 1990. The program enables senior Montana homeowners to more substantially provide for their own in-home support. Lower income seniors 68 years or older have the ability to borrow the equity in their homes and benefit from the additional income.The Reverse Annuity Mortgage Program (RAM) offers lump sum loans and or monthly installment loans to elderly homeowners with long-term care needs over a term of five or ten years. The amount of the RAM loan is based on the equity in the borrower’s home and is repaid to CHFA in one payment when the property is sold, transferred or no longer occupied by the borrower.

HOME Investment Partnerships Program

The HOME Investment Partnerships Program finances housing for low-income populations, including downpayment assistance, construction of homes and apartments, rehabilitation of owner-occupied homes, and rental assistance. The funding source is a block grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). States receive 40 percent of total HOME funding, and localities receive 60 percent directly from HUD, based on a formula determining need.

Project Based Section 8 Program

The Project Based Section 8 agency is the contract administrator for properties that HUD manages throughout Montana.State of Housing in Montana The public housing agencies provide rental assistance to the projects instead of the tenants. Landlords perform administrative tasks at the local level. The agency performs property reviews, property management, and makes payments to owners. The agency earns fees from HUD for the tasks performed using tenant data and rent and payment structure. The Project Based Program renews contracts as they expire. Program specialists do special damage claims, annual rent increases, respond to emergencies, check compliance for fair housing and waiting lists, on-site management reviews, follow-up to physical inspections, review of management decisions, and budget assistance

Tenant-Based Section 8 Program

The Tenant-Based Section 8 Program allows very low income families to pay a set amount towards rent and utilities, based on their gross adjusted income (currently 30%). Very low income families have incomes of 50 percent or less of the HUD median family income for the county in which the family resides, established by HUD annually. Income Limits can be found in the Section 8 Documents page of this site. The programs provide subsidy payments to property owners on behalf of program participants.

Eligibility

Income limits for public housing and vouchers are set by the government. They change every year and are different in different parts of the state and for different sized families. To live in state assisted elderly public housing, you must be at least 60 years old. If you are a person with a disability, you must meet certain criteria to be eligible for state or federal housing for disabled persons.Tenants residing in elderly/handicapped public housing pay 30% of net income and do not pay for any utilities.Tenants residing in the family public housing development pay 30% of net income and pay for some utilities.Tenants residing at "off-site" family housing program pay 32% of net income and do not pay for any utilities.

Income Limits for Subsidized Housing in Montana

1 Person2 Person3 Person4 Person5 Person6 Person7 Person8 Person
11650
19400
31050
46550
13300
22200
35450
53200
14950
24950
39900
59850
16600
27700
44300
66500
17950
29950
47850
71800
19300
32150
51400
77100
20600
34350
54950
82450
21950
36600
58500
87750
13200
21950
35100
52600
15050
25050
40100
60100
16950
28200
45100
67600
18800
31300
50100
75100
20350
33850
54150
81150
21850
36350
58150
87150
23350
38850
62150
93150
24850
41350
66150
99150
11650
19400
31050
46550
13300
22200
35450
53200
14950
24950
39900
59850
16600
27700
44300
66500
17950
29950
47850
71800
19300
32150
51400
77100
20600
34350
54950
82450
21950
36600
58500
87750
13200
21950
35100
52600
15050
25050
40100
60100
16950
28200
45100
67600
18800
31300
50100
75100
20350
33850
54150
81150
21850
36350
58150
87150
23350
38850
62150
93150
24850
41350
66150
99150
11650
19400
31050
46550
13300
22200
35450
53200
14950
24950
39900
59850
16600
27700
44300
66500
17950
29950
47850
71800
19300
32150
51400
77100
20600
34350
54950
82450
21950
36600
58500
87750

Applicants must also pass a criminal background check and may enjoy preferential status if they are:

  • Persons who are homeless due to natural disasters.
  • Persons who are homeless due to public action.
  • Persons with emergency needs (such as domestic violence victims, persons with medical emergencies, or homeless persons facing an immediate threat to their health and safety.
  • Veterans and local residents.

Unemployment Rate in Montana

The unemployment rate for Montana fell 0.0 percentage points in March 2013 to 5.6%. The state unemployment rate was 2.0 percentage points lower than the national rate for the month.

Unemployment RateMarch 2013Month/MonthYear/Year
National 7.6% -0.1 -0.6
Montana 5.6% -0.0 -0.5

The demand for housing and rent subsidy programs in Montana far exceeds the available supply of funds and there is an extensive waiting list.The higher thenemployment rate, the longer the waiting list is. Please ask your particular housing agency for program details.