Housing Authorities in Nevada

State of Housing in NevadaNevada received $7 million from HUD during the first quarter of 2013 to renew support for 30 local homeless housing and service program in Nevada. Additional grants will be given to Nevada in the later part of the year.

Housing Programs

Moving to Work Program

Reno Housing Authority was also selected as the awardee for the Moving to Work Program (MTW).MTW is a demonstration program for public housing authorities (PHAs) that provides them the opportunity to design and test innovative, locally-designed strategies that use Federal dollars more efficiently, help residents find employment and become self-sufficient, and increase housing choices for low-income families. MTW gives PHAs exemptions from many existing public housing and voucher rules and more flexibility with how they use their Federal funds. The Reno Housing Authority will have the flexibility to implement policies and strategies to: 1) Reduce cost and achieve greater costs effectiveness in Federal expenditures; 2) Give incentives to families with children where the head of household is working, is seeking work, or is preparing for work by participating in job training, educational programs, or programs that assist people to obtain employment and become economically self-sufficient; and 3) Increase housing choices for low-income families.

They still must abide by all other federal rules and regulations, including the Fair Housing Act, the Civil Rights Act, labor standards, environmental rules, procurement guidelines, demolition and disposition procedures and relocation regulations. For all activities that affect their residents' rent payments, PHAs must also conduct an impact analysis that recognizes the unforeseen circumstances that may affect their residents and develop an appropriate hardship policy. These safeguards help minimize any potentially negative impact of MTW on residents and communities.

Emergency Solutions Grant Program

The Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act of 2009 (the HEARTH Act) enacted into lawState of Housing in Nevada on May 20, 2009, consolidates three of the separate homeless assistance programs administered by HUD under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act into a single grant program, and revises the Emergency Shelter Grants Program and renames it as the Emergency Solutions Grants Program. The HEARTH Act also codifies into law the Continuum of Care planning process, a longstanding part of HUD’s application process to assist homeless persons by providing greater coordination in responding to their needs. The new ESG Program builds upon the existing Emergency Shelter Grants Program, but places greater emphasis on helping people quickly regain stability in permanent housing after experience a housing crisis and/or homelessness. The key changes that reflect this new emphasis are the expansion of the homelessness prevention component of the Program and the addition of new rapid re-housing assistance component.

Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP)

The Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) was established in 1977 to assist low income persons reduce their utility bills and consumption by providing for various energy conservation measures. Assistance is provided free of charge to individuals receiving assistance.WAP is funded primarily from the Fund for Energy Assistance Conservation (FEAC) in Nevada which was established through the passage of AB661 during the 2001 Legislative Session. Other funding is available through the U.S. Department of Energy, the Housing Division's Low Income Housing Trust Fund (LIHTF), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP),Southwest Gas Corporation and other private sector companies. Funds for weatherization assistance are available to all areas of Nevada.

Hardest Hit Fund

With one of the highest foreclosure rates in the nation, Nevada was selected to be one of the first five states' Housing Finance Agencies to receive funds from the U.S. Treasury’s “Hardest Hit Fund”. The State of Nevada was awarded over $150 million in funds available to qualified recipients.The U.S. Treasury approved the nonprofit Nevada Affordable Housing Assistance Corporation (NAHAC) to oversee the 'Fund' serving as a support arm for the Nevada Housing Division, Nevada’s Housing Finance Agency. Nevada Hardest Hit Fund provides seven programs to assist Nevada homeowners who are at high risk of default or foreclosure.

Eligibility for the Hardest Hit Fund

Homeowners whoare in a financial hardship due to underemployment or unemployment are qualified. They must be legal US residents only, the home is owner-occupied and it is their primary residence, the borrower faces imminent default, andState of Housing in Nevada the mortgage balance does not exceed $417,000. Most importantly, the mortgage servicer has agreed to participate under the terms and conditions governing the use of the funds. Borrowers who are in active bankruptcy do not qualify

Housing Trust Fund

The Housing Trust Fund provides funds for the construction, rehabilitation, and preservation of rental homes and for homeownership for extremely low- and very low-income families.The Fund provides funding to developers to preserve, rehabilitate and construct housing, primarily for extremely low-income families. At least 80 percent of the funds must be used for the production, preservation, rehabilitation, or operation of rental housing. Up to 10 percent can be used for the following homeownership activities for first-time homebuyers: production, preservation, and rehabilitation; down payment assistance, closing cost assistance, and assistance for interest rate buy-downs.

Shelter plus Care (S+C)

This program provides rental assistance for homeless people with disabilities, primarily those with serious mental illness, chronic problems with alcohol and/or drugs, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and related diseases. Rental assistance grants must be matched in the aggregate by supportive services that are equal in value to the amount of rental assistance and appropriate to the needs of the population to be served. Recipients are chosen on a competitive basis nationwide.

Counseling for Homebuyers, Homeowners, and Tenants

HUD provides counseling service through approximately 1,700 HUD-approved counseling agencies. These agencies are public and private nonprofit organizations with housing counseling skills and knowledge of HUD, VA, and conventional housing programs. The funding helps the approved agencies partially meet their operating expenses.

Good Neighbor Next Door

The Good Neighbor Next Door program promotes safe and strong communities by encouraging persons whose daily professional responsibilities represent a nexus to the needs of the community to purchase and live in homes in these communities. This program makes homes in revitalization areas available to law enforcement officers, teachers, firefighters, and emergency medical technicians.

Nursing Homes and Facilities

Assisted living facilities and board and care facilities may contain no fewer than five one‑bedroom or efficiency units.State of Housing in Nevada Nursing home, intermediate care, and board and care services may be combined in the same facility covered by an insured mortgage or may be in separate facilities. Major equipment needed to operate the facility may be included in the mortgage. Facilities for day care may be included.

Choice Neighborhoods

Choice Neighborhoods grants primarily fund the preservation, rehabilitation and transformation of public and HUD-assisted housing. Funds may also be used for the conversion of vacant or foreclosed properties to affordable housing.Grantees must undertake comprehensive local planning with input from residents and the community. A strong emphasis is placed on local community planning for school and educational improvements, including early childhood initiatives. Grantees shall create partnerships with other local organizations including assisted housing owners, service agencies and resident organizations.

Indian Housing

Indian housing assistance (modernization or operating assistance for housing previously developed or operated pursuant to a contract between HUD and an Indian housing authority):

  • Development of additional affordable housing;
  • Housing-related services for affordable housing;
  • Management services for affordable housing;
  • Safety, security, and law enforcement measures and activities appropriate to protect residents of affordable housing from crime; and
  • Housing activities under model programs designed to carry out the purposes of the Act, if specifically approved by HUD, as appropriate.

Lead Hazard Control

This program promotes preventive measures to correct multiple safety and health hazards in the home environment. It addresses childhood lead-based paint poisoning and other childhood diseases associated with poor housing conditions such as exposure to moisture, mold, poor air quality, lead paint, residential application of pesticides, the presence of allergens, vermin, dust, and other substances that contribute to asthma, and hazardous conditions that increase the risk of injury.

Sustainable Communities Initiative

The Sustainable Communities Initiative consists of two grant programs: Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grants and Community Challenge Planning Grants. The Initiative also has a research and evaluation program. ResearchState of Housing in Nevada and Evaluation funding is also available, in coordination with the Department of Transportation, to evaluate both grant programs and support sustainable communities planning.

The HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing

The HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program combines Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) rental assistance for homeless Veterans with case management and clinical services provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). VA provides these services for participating Veterans at VA medical centers (VAMCs) and community-based outreach clinics.After determining which areas of the country have the highest number of homeless Veterans, the VA Central Office identifies VA facilities in the corresponding communities. HUD then selects PHAs near to the identified VA facilities, taking into consideration the PHAs’ administrative performance, and sends the PHAs invitations to apply for the vouchers.

Eligibility

Income limits for Nevada’s housing programs change every year and are different in different parts of the state and for different sized families.

Income Limits for Housing Subsidy

------------------------------ 2013 ADJUSTED HOME INCOME LIMITS ------------------------------
1 Person2 Person3 Person4 Person5 Person6 Person7 Person8 Person
14600
24350
29220
38950
16700
27800
33360
44500
18800
31300
37560
50050
20850
34750
41700
55600
22550
37550
45060
60050
24200
40350
48420
64500
25900
43100
51720
68950
27550
45900
55080
73400
13600
22650
27180
36250
15550
25900
31080
41400
17500
29150
34980
46600
19400
32350
38820
51750
21000
34950
41940
55900
22550
37550
45060
60050
24100
40150
48180
64200
25650
42750
51300
68350
14250
23800
28560
38050
16300
27200
32640
43450
18350
30600
36720
48900
20350
33950
40740
54300
22000
36700
44040
58650
23650
39400
47280
63000
25250
42100
50520
67350
26900
44850
53820
71700
14250
23700
28440
37900
16250
27050
32460
43300
18300
30450
36540
48700
20300
33800
40560
54100
21950
36550
43860
58450
23550
39250
47100
62800
25200
41950
50340
67100
26800
44650
53580
71450
16450
27400
32880
43800
18800
31300
37560
50050
21150
35200
42240
56300
23450
39100
46920
62550
25350
42250
50700
67600
27250
45400
54480
72600
29100
48500
58200
77600
31000
51650
61980
82600
16800
28000
33600
44750
19200
32000
38400
51150
21600
36000
43200
57550
23950
39950
47940
63900
25900
43150
51780
69050
27800
46350
55620
74150
29700
49550
59460
79250
31650
52750
63300
84350
13600
22650
27180
36250
15550
25900
31080
41400
17500
29150
34980
46600
19400
32350
38820
51750
21000
34950
41940
55900
22550
37550
45060
60050
24100
40150
48180
64200
25650
42750
51300
68350

Applicants must also pass a criminal background check and may enjoy preferential status if they are: 1) Persons who are homeless due to natural disasters; 2) Persons who are homeless due to public action; 3) Persons with emergency needs (such as domestic violence victims, persons with medical emergencies, or homeless persons facing an immediate threat to their health and safety; and 4) Veterans and local residents.

Unemployment Rate in Nevada

The unemployment rate for Nevada rose 0.1 percentage points in March 2013 to 9.7%. The unemployment rate in Nevada peaked in September 2010 at 14.0% and is now 4.3 percentage points lower. From a post peak low of 9.6% in February 2013, the unemployment rate has now grown by 0.1 percentage points.

Unemployment RateMarch 2013Month/MonthYear/Year
National 7.6% -0.1 -0.6
Nevada 9.7% +0.1 -1.9

Nevada’s unemployment rate is at 2.1 percentage points higher than the national rate for the first quarter of 2013.This may affect the housing waiting lists considerably, too. Please ask your housing agency for the details of the program you are interested in.